Summertime Business

Rising temperatures and high humidity have long been a feature of summer in this part of Ohio, and where there’s a need, there will be a business to deal with it. K.B.S. Sales and Service was located where Yoga Springs Studio and Design Sleep operate now in the red brick building at 108 Dayton Street.

Fans were a popular advertising specialty in the days when churches were yet to be centrally air-conditioned, and although the fan on a balsa stick was probably more common, K.B.S.’s version  was easier to collapse for pocket or purse.

Product Demonstrations

Product Demonstrations

ad specialty fan

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From the Antioch Bookplate Archives — Hamilton and Hubbell

There were artists who provided numerous designs for the Antioch Bookplate Company, but there were also many artists who are represented by only one or two designs.

Not much is know about Everett Hamilton, woodcut designer of F-698/M-93 and M-94 (sold briefly in 1950), except that in 1936 he produced a book of numbered print woodcuts on the seven deadly sins.

Antioch bookplate design F-698'/M-93

F-698/M-93

Antioch bookplate design M-94

M-94

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Of F-698/M-93 Ernest Morgan says, “Life, symbolized by the hour glass, is entwined by sorrow and joy, represented by the dead thorn and the blossoms…”

Of M-94, Morgan’s description: “This clever woodcut, symbolizing knowledge and temptation, inadvertently suggest the medical emblem.”

Antioch bookplate design F-620/M-96

F–620/M-96

Bradford Hubbell provided a single design, F-620/M-96, which was introduced in 1950 and sold for about 20 years. Ernest Morgan provides one of his more amusing notes regarding this design:  “…an Antioch student artist, offered to draw a design for us about 1928, and asked what subject we would like. I told him anything but ships. He said sorry, he could only draw ships and prizefighters. So we got a ship, an authentic brig. It proved a best seller.”

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The Famous Civil War General at a Festival, part 1

How many know that a Civil War general who has a fort and several streets named after him in California was once a resident of Yellow Springs (or his family was while he was off to war)?

Although evidence indicates that William Rosecrans and family were renters rather than property-owners, one can find traces of their lives in Yellow Springs in the newspaper and letters, and in the glass of an attic window where the children scratched their name and initials.

What follows is a transcription of an article in the Greene County Journal reporting on a fundraiser festival during the Civil War given for the support of the troops, and at which General Rosecrans gave some remarks.

Besides what Rosecrans had to say, what is of particular interest is the kind of activities were typical for community festivals 150+ years ago. Given the greater difficulties of transportation, it is somewhat surprising that fresh oysters were popular so far from the ocean, and what would a “ring cake” have been, and why would there have been two of them?

Our Visit to Yellow Springs—The Festival—Remarks of Gen. Rosecrans, etc., etc.

On Friday last we concluded that we would visit the Yellow Springs, a place we had often heard of, but one which we had never seen. We felt a curiosity to realize all that our fair correspondent, “BELL BLUE” had said of that beautiful village, and its intelligent and hospitable inhabitants. It affords us much pleasure in saying that we found the statements of “BELL” perfectly true. We made the acquaintance of many of the citizens and found them warm-hearted and social. In the evening the Ladies’ Solders Aid Society gave a Festival which we had the privilege of attending, and which was, in truth, a magnificent affair. The gentlemanly proprietor of the Yellow Springs House, Mr. J. W. EDWARDS, generously permitted the Society to use his spacious mansion for the Festival, every nook and corner of which was thronged by joyous and happy citizens. The whole number present was upwards of three hundred, about two-thirds of whom were ladies.

We take pleasure in giving below the names of officers and Committees of the Society, as furnished to us by the Secretary, Miss JULIA HARLAN, to whose efficiency and good management the success of the Festival must be attributed:

Officers of the Soldiers Aid Society of Yellow Springs.–Mrs. COL. WILSON, President; Mrs. KELLOGG, Vice-President; Mrs. JAMES STEWART, Treasurer; Miss JULIA HARLAN, Secretary.

Managers.–Mrs. WEEKS, Mrs. AARON HARLAN, Mrs. DR. LE FEVER, Mrs. ARMSTRONG.

Festival and Table Committee.–Mrs. KELLOGG, Mrs. GEN. SMITH, Mrs. LAWRENCE, Mrs. JAMES STEWART, Mrs. COL. WILSON, Mrs. VAN MATER, Mrs. SIZER, Mrs. WEEKS, Mrs. DR. PROTZMAN, Miss BRYAN, Miss JULIA HARLAN, Mr. REED, Mr. SIZER, DR. LE FEVER, COL. WILSON.

Oyster Committee.–Mrs. AARON HARLAN, Mrs. WESTON, Mrs. FESSENDEN, Mrs. LE FEVER, Mrs. WARD.

Coffee Committee.–Mrs. MCINTOSH, Mrs. LADLIE.

Cake and Ice-Cream Committee.–Miss MARY CONDON, Miss JULIA HARLAN, Mr. ELMER HOPKINS, Mr. JACKSON ARMSTRONG.

1st Ring Cake Committee.–Miss LOUISA HARLAN, Mr. PRUGH.

2nd Ring Cake Committee.– Mrs. IRWIN, Miss WARD, Miss LOUISA HARLAN, Mrs. GEN. T. K. SMITH.

Fancy Table Committee.–Mrs. IRWIN, Miss WARD, Miss LOUISA HARLAN, Mrs. GEN. T. K. SMITH.

Inner-Keepers[?].–Mr. VAN MATER, Mr. J. STEWART.

Collectors for Tables.–Dr. LE FEVER, Mr. ANDERSON, Col. WILSON.

Grab-Bag Committee.–BESSIE SMITH, NANNIE MILLS, MAMIE ROSECRANS, ALTIE GRINNELL, JULIA SCAMMON, JULIA MILLS, BELL SMITH, JENNIE WEEKS.

Committee on Decorations.–Mrs. IRWIN, Mrs. DR.CHENEY, Miss LEONARD, Miss EMMA WILSON, Miss BRADSHAW, Miss FANNY RICE, Mr. H. GOODMAN, Mr. SIZER, Miss LADLIE, Miss BOTSFORD, Miss BIRCH, Mrs. CHEESEBOROUGH.

Musicians.–Prof. L. G. FESSENDEN, Leader; GEO. HUFFORD, WM. HAFNER, S. F. GREEN, S. T. MARSH, B. R. GASS, A. KING, L. W. TUILLACE.

The Yellow Springs House was decorated in a very appropriate manner, and was splendidly illuminated by magnificent chandeliers; the entire Hall wherein the Festival was held was lined with National Flags. The Supper furnished by the Society consisted of the choicest viands. The music discoursed by Prof. FESSENDEN’s String Band was delightful indeed. In short the Festival was a grand success.

Soon after supper General ROSECRANS being present was called upon for a speech. The General was introduced to the audience by Colonel WILSON. After the strain of applause with which he was greeted upon being presented to the company had subsided, the General spoke in substance as follows:

“Ladies and gentlemen: I have been requested to say a few words. I suppose I have a right to do so. I see a great many kind faces whose names are to me unknown: I shall have to trust to luck for an opportunity to become better acquainted at some future time. I do no think I should compliment the people of the Springs for their being here to-night. The cause which they have espoused has brought them together; they need no praise from me. Great as was the struggle that secured the Independence of this country—greatly as we revere our revolutionary mothers—the women of this age—the mothers, wives and sweet-hearts of the soldiers of this war are much greater. I have seen soldiers supplied with food and raiment by the women of the county, when it was not in the power of the Government to supply their wants. Let no man fancy that our county would be safe if our soldiers were removed from the front. Our safety depends on the utter overthrow of the rebels. The soldier is in continual danger. What is to console him for the privations he is suffering? The first thing that keeps him there, is that he may aid in preserving the Government; the second is that the soldiers’ liberties are preserved at home: his family provided for, he can look back to the place where his beloved ones are left and feel sure that during his absence they will be properly cared for and all their wants will be supplied.” [Great applause.] “Ladies and gentlemen, I bid you all good night.”

The receipts of the Festival, after all the collections were made, amounted to two hundred and seventeen dollars and seventy-six cents, a sum which will, under the direction of the Sanitary Commission, be the means of making glad many a sick soldier.

We are under many special obligatioins to Mr. GRAM, of the Neff House; Mr. EDWARDS, of the Yellow Springs House; Esq. HAMILTON, Col. WILSON, and Mr. JAMES STEWART, for the kind treatment we received.

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Carr Nursery Catalog — Fuchsias

(Previous entries in the series — (23456789 and 10) The timing for page 11 just after Independence Day as a blog entry is somewhat fortuitous, since there is probably no garden flower that more resembles fireworks than fuchsias, both in form and color. In the transcript which follows the page image, the fuchsia name, whenever possible, is linked to a current color image. For some reason fuchsia varieties popular in 1898 have endured in popularity more than carnations or chrysanthemums.

1898 Carr Nursery Catalog pg11-Fuchsias   LIST OF FUCHSIAS. The best Varieties. Any Six for 50 cts. 1898-FuchsiasThe King of Fuchsias, Phenomenal. The flowers are of enormous proportions, being very double, very broad and of great substance, well reflexed, of a most beautiful coral-red, corolla intense bright sky-blue. This is without comparison as a novelty. The largest Fuchsia grown. Price, good strong plants, 15 cents each. New Perpetual Double Flowering Weeping Fuchsia, Storm King. This beautiful novelty, introduced a few years since, is a decided acquisition and deserves a place in every garden. Our stock is genuine. The buds, for two weeks before they expand, are balls of glowing, scarlet crimson. The flowers continue to grow larger and larger after they expand. The sepals are of the same glowing, scarlet crimson as the buds, thile the large, double corolla is of delicate, waxy whiteness, elegantly penciled with deep, bright crimson. Price, 15 cents each.

Fuchsias. Standard Varieties. Price, 8 cents each; ten sorts, our selection, 50 cents.Aurora Superba.—Orange-scarlet corolla; sepals a rich salmon. Arabella.—Tube and sepals pure white; corolla a rose color. Bland’s New Striped.—The tub and sepals are a glowing crimson, corolla a rich plum-colored purple, regularly and distinctly striped red rose. Carl Halt.—A white and red striped variety. A very graceful and beautiful variety. Champion of the World.—Large double flowers, well reflexed, and of a most beautiful coral red, corolla a most intense bright, dark purple. Elm City.—Sepals a rich crimson, corolla a deep purple, double, very free flowering. Extra fine. Earl of Beaconsfield.—The blooms are three inches in length and of great substance. The tubes are of a light, rosy carmine, corolla a deep carmine. Joseph Rosain.—Double, very large, scarlet tube and sepals, corolla violet-blue, striped blue. Jules Monge.—New. Lovely sky-blue, double corolla, banded with scarlet. Lord Byron.—Crimson petals, dark purple corolla. Very handsome. Lustre.—Tubes and sepals pure white, vivid crimson corolla. Monarch.—Immense flowers, tubes and sepals bright red, of great length. New Double White Fuchsia, White Giant.—The largest and best white Fuchsia grown. Fine form, very double, color a pure white. We find it to be an excellent winter bloomer. Price, 10 cents each. New Double Fuchsia, Jupiter.—All lovers of the beautiful class of plants will be pleased to note the addition of another variety of Fuchsias that produces such wonderful large flowers as Phenomenal. Jupiter is a sport of that variety and is similar to it in every respect, except in the coloring of the corolla, which is a beautiful shade of light magenta with dark crimson veins. Price, 15 cents each. President F. Gunther.—A grand sort with large double flowers, the sepals of delicate carmine. The corolla is a bright lilac, darkened with violet. A beautiful and fine variety. Price, 10 cents each. General Roberts.—A remarkable, beautiful variety of drooping habit. The blooms are from four to five inches in length, borne in large clusters, single corolla, of a rich plum color, tube and sepals crimson. Price, 10 cents each. Monsieur Thibaut.—A splendid variety, with large, handsome foliage of a delightful green tint. The foliage alone would make it worthy of cultivation. The flowers are single, of unusual size, sepals dark red, corolla rose vermilion, tinted violet. Price, 10 cents each.

Verbenas, Mammoth Flowering One of the most useful and popular plants for bedding out, affording constant bloom and an endless variety of colors and markings, and are of the simplest culture and management. Price, 10 cents each; six distinct sorts for 50 cents; thirteen for $1.00.

Smilax. [now considered something of a nuisance] This very great climber is a great addition to our basket plants, possessing the rare qualities of delicate and tolerably dense foliage and vining habit. For using for a green with cut flowers is has no equal, its hard texture enabling it to keep several days without wilting after being cut. It is also fine as a parlor window plant.

Price, 6 cents each. Salvia, Flowering Sage. The Salvia is of easy culture, attaining a height of two to three feet. The flowers are very attractive; are fine for bedding, the scarlet variety especially. Splendens.—The standard sort for bedding, flower spikes of the most brilliant scarlet. Price, 10 cents each.

Saxafraga [sic] Sarmentosa. A handsome plant of low habit, leaves nearly round and striped freely with silver bands, blooms white, of great beauty and borne in spikes nearly twelve inches high. Fine for hanging baskets, vases, etc. Price, 5 cents each; three for 12 cents; eight for 25 cents. [actual name is "Saxifraga"]

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Happy Fourth!

Images from parades past

Picture undated, but note the bank clock and "Miami Deposit" sign. Ken Struewing is Abraham Lincoln.

Picture undated, but note the bank clock and “Miami Deposit” sign. Ken Struewing is Abraham Lincoln.

Bicentennial Yellow Springs, July 2003

Bicentennial Yellow Springs, July 2003

Horace Mann puppet, created for the Bicentennial Pageant

Horace Mann puppet, created for the Bicentennial Pageant

Wheeling Gaunt puppet, created for the 2003 Bicentennial Pageant

Wheeling Gaunt puppet, created for the 2003 Bicentennial Pageant

July 4, 2005

July 4, 2005

July 4, 2005

July 4, 2005

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Yellow Springs Heritage Finds a Carr Farewell

Yellow Springs Heritage shared the obituary for Thad Carr who was mentioned previously on this blog for his Corry Street home.

"Landing of Emigrants" — Thad Carr and family

“Landing of Emigrants” — Thad Carr and family

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Historical Society Loses a Friend

The passing of Don Hutslar is a loss for the Yellow Springs Hisorical Society and anyone who values local history. He was a dedicated researcher and raconteur and an invaluable resource.

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In the good old summertime…

One of many photographs in Antioch College’s Antiochiana archives of the way of life in Yellow Springs of yore (unfortunately without details as to the identity of the subjects or particular location).

Since the women would have had several layers of clothing, it’s hard to imagine them with the ambition to do much beyond relaxing in the hammock!

4Girls_Hammock

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From the Antioch Bookplate Archives — Antioch College, Part 3

Given the recent development for which Antioch College is to be heartily congratulated, it seems only appropriate to contribute another post showing the special presentation/memorial bookplates created for the use of the Antioch College Olive Kettering Library. (Previous posts showing similar bookplates here and here)

The presentation bookplate served several purposes for both living donor’s and the families of memorialized individuals. The name would be remembered as long as the book in which it was placed remained in circulation, and in addition, the selection of books into which the plates would be affixed was a way of commemorating the values of he honoree. Besides the wide variety of artistic styles demonstrated. a privately-created bookplate could make use of unusual paper stock, as the parchment-look blue of the Lyttle bookplate or the metallic silver of the Carnegie Corporation example. Antioch_30-Smith_Priv Antioch_33-Locke_Priv Antioch_34-Carrillo_Priv Antioch_35-Lyttle_Priv Antioch_31-Smith_PrivAntioch-Carnegie_18_Priv

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Getting Around Old-Style

The photograph shown below, courtesy of Antiochiana, does not identify either the gentleman or the location, but our early June weather (when not rainstorms) would make a carriage ride an appealing mode of transportation.

Man_Carriage2

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